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GRADY HEALTH FOUNDATION RECEIVES DONATION FROM BLUE CROSS AND BLUE SHIELD OF GEORGIA

01/14/14

BCBSGA_GHF

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Georgia (BCBSGA) commemorated and reaffirmed their pledge to Grady Health Foundation of $250,000 this past week in support of Grady Health System’s 2014 initiatives including a Women’s and Infants’ Center. The Grady Health Foundation works with corporations like BCBSGA throughout the year as the fundraising arm of the metro-region’s premier Level 1 Trauma Center, providing continued health and well-being to Atlanta through this vital public resource.

“Thanks to Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Georgia’s generous gift, we can further support the new plan for redesigning the Women’s and Infants’ center as one of the top priorities for Grady,” said Renay Blumenthal, President of Grady Health Foundation.

“We are proud to support Grady’s efforts to give newborns the opportunity for a healthy start in life,” said Morgan Kendrick, President of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Georgia. “The first three years of a child’s life are critical to good development and this grant will help ensure success for Grady and the families it serves.”

Similar to BCBSGA, corporations, foundations and individual citizens can donate to Grady Health Foundation year-round. These donations will help build and execute a sustainable, strategic and diversified funding plan that can support Grady and raise its community profile. For more information on ways to give, visit: www.gradyhealthfoundation.org/ways-to-give/.

Grady Hospital Receives Top Designation for Stroke Care

07/29/13

Grady Health Foundation

Grady Hospital’s Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center has earned a top designation for stroke care by an independent accrediting agency for health care organizations. The Center has been designated an Advanced Comprehensive Stroke Center by the Joint Commission.

Grady is one of 50 U.S. stroke centers and three in Georgia who have received the designation since it began last year. According to the Joint Commission, those who receive the recognition have significant resources in training, staff and infrastructure that allow them to provide state-of-the-art complex stroke care. Dr. Michael Frankel is director and chief of neurology for the center and Professor of Neurology at Emory University.

“It is a seal of approval for the work that we’ve been doing and it tells the community that the work that we’re doing is of the highest quality and it also is a place where people can count on some of the best nurses and physicians to take care of them.”

Grady received the recognition after a two-day evaluation. Emory University and Georgia Regents Medical Center in Augusta are the only other Georgia stroke centers to receive the designation.

http://wabe.org/post/grady-hospital-receives-top-designation-stroke-care

Grady Health Foundation Names Renay Blumenthal President

07/18/13

Grady Health Foundation

Community leader has deep civic, foundation, business and political ties

Grady Health System CEO John Haupert today announced Renay Blumenthal, a long-time community leader, will be the new president of the Grady Health Foundation.

“Over a 25-year career, Renay has built strong relationships in this community — with governors, legislators, mayors and county commissioners, and executives of corporations, foundations and civic groups,” said Haupert. “We are thrilled that she will take the foundation’s helm as it marks two decades of service to the community and maps out its next 20 years.”

Blumenthal’s primary focus with the Grady Foundation will be fundraising. The foundation brings together philanthropists, corporate leaders and civic activists to increase public awareness, raise critical dollars and improve the quality of healthcare services for metro Atlanta and the state.

The new foundation president’s background uniquely qualifies her for the role. Blumenthal’s career spans a rare mix of both public and private sector experience.

For nearly 10 years, she has served as senior vice president of public policy for the Metro Atlanta Chamber, where she directed initiatives to strengthen the region and city.

Blumenthal has served as an adviser to Georgia’s top elected officials, serving as policy director to former Gov. Roy Barnes; budget and policy director to former Gov. Zell Miller, and budget chief to former Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin. She was also instrumental to former Gov. Sonny Perdue’s transition team.

“People respect Renay because they’ve worked in the trenches with her on important issues,” said A.D. “Pete” Correll, chairman of the Grady Memorial Hospital Corporation’s board. “She helped run budgets for both the city and the state. And her work on the Greater Grady Task Force is one reason why Grady is so healthy today.”

The Task Force, run by the Chamber under Blumenthal’s guidance, helped galvanize public support for Grady Hospital that led to a $325 million infusion.

“Renay is a coalition builder, a skilled diplomat and an expert fundraiser with a stellar track record for getting things done – especially for Grady,” said Drew Evans, chairman of the Grady Health Foundation’s board. “Her leadership is critical as we tell Grady’s story in a way that continues to motivate the community to be part of its success.”

Robert L. Brown, president and CEO of R. L. Brown & Associates and past Grady Health Foundation board chairman, who helped create the foundation in 1993, agreed that Blumenthal has always been a champion for Grady.

“Throughout her career, Renay has used her positions of authority to strengthen Grady, from being a friend to Grady when she worked in the governor’s office, to building support from the business and philanthropic communities through the Greater Grady Task Force,” said Brown. “Grady couldn’t ask for a more committed leader to take the reins at this important moment in the foundation’s history.”

As president, Blumenthal will lead and manage all aspects of the Grady Health Foundation, including setting the foundation’s strategic direction, coordinating all fundraising activities, and providing community outreach to increase support for Grady.

“Renay knows how to bring people together,” said Rep. Stacey Abrams, House Minority Leader for the Georgia General Assembly. “She is highly respected for her ability to help people with different concerns and different interests find common ground on the things that matter most to all of us.”

Blumenthal said she welcomed the opportunity to build on the foundation’s position of strength.

“Grady has always been a passion of mine, and I am deeply honored by this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to play a central role in its future,” Blumenthal said. “I’m eager to build on the incredible accomplishments of my predecessor and friend Lisa Borders, who has raised the foundation’s profile and built support for Grady across the region.”
A native Atlantan, Blumenthal is a graduate of Georgia Tech and holds a Master of Business Administration from Georgia State University. She was a Georgia Trend “40 under 40″ honoree in 2001 and a member of the Leadership Georgia class in 2000 and Leadership Atlanta class in 2006. As one of Georgia’s top female lobbyists, she has been named a “Power Chick” for four years in a row by James Magazine. She was also recognized as a Woman of Achievement by the YWCA in 2009 and received an Impact Leader award from Business to Business magazine in 2010.

Blumenthal serves on several community boards. She is chair of Leadership Atlanta, immediate past chair of the Clean Air Campaign, and a member of the Grady Hospital Board of Visitors, Georgia Forward and the Women’s Forum of Georgia. She and her husband, Ned, live in Atlanta and have two young children, Michael and Rachel.

Renay Blumenthal named as new president of Grady Health Foundation

07/18/13
Renay Blumenthal
Renay Blumenthal

The Grady Health Foundation hired Renay Blumenthal, senior vice president of public policy for the Metro Atlanta Chamber, as its new president.

The appointment was announced Tuesday morning by Grady Health System CEO John Haupert.

“Over a 25-year career, Renay has built strong relationships in this community — with governors, legislators, mayors and county commissioners, and executives of corporations, foundations and civic groups,” Haupert said. “We are thrilled that she will take the foundation’s helm as it marks two decades of service to the community and maps out its next 20 years.”

Blumenthal succeeds Lisa Borders, who recently left the foundation to join The Coca-Cola Co. (NYSE: KO).

“This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to serve Grady and play a central role in its future,” Blumenthal said in a phone interview Wednesday morning. “At the end of the day, what I see for the foundation is that we need to constantly remind the community what an incredible asset Grady is to the city and the state.”

Blumenthal said her last day at the Metro Atlanta Chamber will be July 31 and her new job at the Grady Foundation will begin on Sept. 3. The focus of her new position will be primarily on fundraising. The foundation brings together philanthropists, corporate leaders and civic activists to increase public awareness, raise critical dollars and improve the quality of healthcare services for metro Atlanta and the state.

Blumenthal’s primary focus with the Grady Foundation will be fundraising. The foundation brings together philanthropists, corporate leaders and civic activists to increase public awareness, raise critical dollars and improve the quality of healthcare services for metro Atlanta and the state.

Bluementhal has been at the Metro Atlanta Chamber for nearly 10 years, directing several initiatives aimed at strengthening the region and city.

Before the Chamber, Blumenthal was an adviser to Georgia’s top elected officials. She served as policy director to former Gov. Roy Barnes; budget and policy director to former Gov. Zell Miller; and budget chief to former Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin. She was also instrumental to former Gov. Sonny Perdue’s transition team.

“People respect Renay because they’ve worked in the trenches with her on important issues,” said A.D. “Pete” Correll, chairman of the Grady Memorial Hospital Corp.’s board. “She helped run budgets for both the city and the state. And her work on the Greater Grady Task Force is one reason why Grady is so healthy today.”

The Task Force, run by the Chamber under Blumenthal’s guidance, helped galvanize public support for Grady Hospital that led to a $325 million infusion.

“Renay is a coalition builder, a skilled diplomat and an expert fundraiser with a stellar track record for getting things done – especially for Grady,” said Drew Evans, chairman of the Grady Health Foundation’s board. “Her leadership is critical as we tell Grady’s story in a way that continues to motivate the community to be part of its success.”

Robert L. Brown, president and CEO of R. L. Brown & Associates and past Grady Health Foundation board chairman, who helped create the foundation in 1993, agreed that Blumenthal has always been a champion for Grady.

“Throughout her career, Renay has used her positions of authority to strengthen Grady, from being a friend to Grady when she worked in the governor’s office, to building support from the business and philanthropic communities through the Greater Grady Task Force,” said Brown. “Grady couldn’t ask for a more committed leader to take the reins at this important moment in the foundation’s history.”

As president, Blumenthal will lead and manage all aspects of the Grady Health Foundation, including setting the foundation’s strategic direction, coordinating all fundraising activities, and providing community outreach to increase support for Grady.

“Renay knows how to bring people together,” said Rep. Stacey Abrams, House Minority Leader for the Georgia General Assembly. “She is highly respected for her ability to help people with different concerns and different interests find common ground on the things that matter most to all of us.”

Blumenthal said she welcomed the opportunity to build on the foundation’s position of strength.

“I’m eager to build on the incredible accomplishments of my predecessor and friend Lisa Borders, who has raised the foundation’s profile and built support for Grady across the region,” Blumenthal said.

The foundation is in its 20th year, which is a good time to assess its impact and its next steps, Blumenthal added.

“We are going to be looking at how we create a sustainable fundraising model going forward in a highly changing and volatile healthcare environment,” she said. “That makes it very exciting to me.”

A native Atlantan, Blumenthal is a graduate of Georgia Tech and holds a Master of Business Administration from Georgia State University. She was a Georgia Trend “40 under 40” honoree in 2001 and a member of the Leadership Georgia class in 2000 and Leadership Atlanta class in 2006. As one of Georgia’s top female lobbyists, she has been named a “Power Chick” for four years in a row by James Magazine. She was also recognized as a Woman of Achievement by the YWCA in 2009 and received an Impact Leader award from Business to Business magazine in 2010.

Blumenthal serves on several community boards. She is chair of Leadership Atlanta, immediate past chair of the Clean Air Campaign, and a member of the Grady Hospital Board of Visitors, Georgia Forward and the Women’s Forum of Georgia. She and her husband, Ned, live in Atlanta and have two young children, Michael and Rachel.

Grady Health System is one of the largest public health systems in the United States. Grady consists of the 953-bed Grady Memorial Hospital, six neighborhood health centers, Crestview Health & Rehabilitation Center, and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Hughes Spalding, which is operated as a Children’s affiliate.

In 2011 Grady was named one of Atlanta’s Best Hospitals by U.S. News & World Report. In 2012, Hospitals & Health Networks Magazine named Grady one of the country’s Most Wired health systems.

http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/news/2013/07/10/renay-blumenthal-named-grady-health.html?page=all

Mom’s death inspires doctor’s life work

05/14/13

Grady Health Foundation

“How much did you weigh when you were born?” Dr. Alfred Brann asks the first time we talk.

It’s not a typical, get-to-know-you kind of question, but it seems almost normal coming from Brann. He’s a pediatric neurologist who specializes in perinatal medicine and reproductive health in the United States and developing countries.

Each year, worldwide, nearly 1 million babies die on the day they are born, according to a new report from Save the Children. Giving birth is also risky for mothers; nearly 800 women die every day during pregnancy or childbirth. While we’ve made significant strides in reducing child and maternal mortality rates since the 1970s, there are still many lives to save.

“Almost all newborn deaths originate from preventable and treatable causes,” the report authors write. “We already have the tools available to save about three-quarters of the newborns who needlessly die each year.”

Brann has worked his entire life to ensure that moms and their babies have the best chance of survival.

In 1983, he co-wrote the American Academy of Pediatrics’ first official “Guidelines for Perinatal Care,” which is still being used by doctors to ensure pregnant women and their infants receive quality care.

Now, as director of the Global Collaborating Center in Reproductive Health at Emory University in Atlanta, Brann’s primary focus is on preventing low birth weight by improving women’s health care.

Brann recently spoke with CNN about his work and the personal loss that inspired his passion. The following is an edited version of that interview:

CNN: Why are you so passionate about this issue?

Dr. Alfred Brann: My mother died during my birth in 1934 in Arkansas. She was 30 when I was born. She was born in the 1900s and she went to college — unusual for (women at that time).

I think if there had been a cesarean section possibility, then my mother would have survived. It was unclear whether she had an old rheumatic heart disease that may have affected a valve. Or … there was a lot of malaria at the time. The possibility might have been that she had malarial heart disease and was really tired out and couldn’t make labor.

They had to pull me out. My mother died shortly after that.

 

CNN: What are the most common health issues associated with a low birthweight?

Brann: A low-birthweight infant is at greater risk for respiratory distress, bacterial infections, gastrointestinal tract problems and the effects of jaundice. In surviving infants weighing less than 3.5 pounds, problems of neurodevelopmental disabilities include cerebral palsy, impaired mental development, blindness and hearing deficits.

 

CNN: The center at Emory has developed what’s called a “systems approach” to reducing maternal and infant deaths. Why is that important?

Brann: We have to treat the triad of the mother, the fetus and the newborn in a very special, continuous way. There has to be a systems approach to care.

(Infant) mortality, you see, we don’t have a vaccine to prevent that. It’s not like polio; it’s not like smallpox. From the moment a little girl is born… all the things that influence her life, all the factors that influence her life, are extremely important.

We clearly understand that the missing link in all (maternal and infant deaths) is the absence of women’s health. That’s not pregnant women’s health, you see. It’s women’s health.

It’s critical that we change our whole view, that the woman is more than a vessel for making children. Her health is very vital.

 

CNN: What’s the goal of the center?

Brann: “The role in those in leadership must be to continuously reevaluate what is unacceptable.” That’s (a quote) from the doctor that eradicated smallpox.

I’ve sort of moved from (saving) the high-risk, critical, intensive-care tiny babies to finally asking myself, “Where are all of these babies coming from, and can we have fewer?”

Yes, we need continued research on finding out why things happen. But there is a moral imperative in implementing what we already know works. And the collaborating center has been about that mission.

 

CNN: What have you’ve learned working in developing nations?

Brann: We’ve probably … worked in some 30 different countries. (We are) in active projects right now in Russia and in Mexico. We have been working in Cuba a number of years. Our center is working in places like Afghanistan, and the Central Asian republics, some in sub-Saharan Africa. I’ve worked in all those regions.

The message, I think, there is the fact that if you do not have malaria, then the issues surrounding women’s health and pregnancy outcomes — whether it’s in the delta of Mississippi, in south Fulton County in Atlanta, Islamabad, in Beijing, in Havana, in Mexico City — all around the world, the issues of women’s health are the same.

 

CNN: What do you mean?

Brann: Women in low-resource settings have difficulty controlling their lives. You didn’t choose your parents, and… you didn’t choose your color of your skin. You didn’t choose the country in which you’re born. If you think carefully, that probably influences 90% of our (health) outcomes. We have maybe 10% left.

It’s just great to be involved in helping to improve a system of health care through which we never ask to come.

We work within ministries of health, and also within universities, so that we can help design systems that influence all of the population.

 

CNN: What is most crucial for a woman to have a healthy baby?

Brann: Not too early, not too many, not too soon and not too late.

The best outcome for a healthy pregnancy is to be wanted, planned and have access to prenatal care with appropriate nutrition and delivered by a skilled attendant … followed by access to modern contraception for appropriate child spacing.

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